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Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such
04-27-2014, 05:12 PM (This post was last modified: 04-27-2014 05:12 PM by My Alter Ego.)
Post: #91
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such
Tom22, congratulations on your diligence and persistence, and thus, your find. Good research.

I had suspected that Clara had something to do with it, although I initially thought that it might have been after her husband's death. I've read something, somewhere that she and Brahms (yes, that one) compiled and did much to promote Schumann's works after his death. So I thought that, perhaps, Clara (or, even Brahms) might have edited the piece.

In either case, Järvi's choice of Khatia could have a variety of reasons. Since they are both from areas of the former USSR, there is that obvious connection. The conductor may have heard her many years before, and had been keeping an eye on her progress.

Khatia's recordings have been of Liszt and Chopin. Schumann was a contemporary of both pianists/composers, while few would put him in the same league. But there are some similarities, so it may have been a fairly easy shift to Schumann.

Given the above statement, it also may be that she was within the price range that the orchestra could afford. (Not what we like to think of, but certainly something that the business office must consider.)

Finally, she may have been a last minute choice because the originally selected soloist had to bow out at the last minute. (And while really I don't think this is the case, it does happen. And if it did happen here, either she's played the piece in the past, or she's a phenomenally quick study at memorization!)

I want to amend or clarify my earlier statement regarding whom the members of the orchestra follow, because I'm not certain that I've been clear. Yes, the orchestra should and most likely will follow the conductor -- unless, of course, the conductor displays his/her incompetence. (And, yes, I have witnessed such an uncomfortable situation.)

And, yes, the conductor and the soloist need to be in communication in order to be on the same page. My suspicion is that the soloist that is brought in will be one who most closely aligns with how the conductor/music director interprets the piece the soloist is to play. But that may be an ideal.

(When you're the New York Philharmonic or London Symphony or some other hugely well known orchestra, you can probably bring in any one you want, but smaller markets will have to keep an eye on the bottom line. I'm sure you understand that, Tom.)

So back to whom the orchestra responds. Bottom line, they're trained to follow the conductor: they have to. When you've got that many "moving parts," there isn't an option.

Yet on one hand, the conductor does need to be responsive to the soloist. On the other hand, the soloist, to some degree, has to respond and follow the conductor. It's a delicate dance, which is why when the result is good, great, or better, it's such a delight! But you know this, Tom.

I do wonder if you haven't mistaken a "command performance" with "standing ovation."

But again, congrats on your discovery!
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04-30-2014, 04:32 AM (This post was last modified: 04-30-2014 04:43 AM by Tusk.)
Post: #92
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such
Last week I traveled to NY to attend my Niece's performance with a her High School Band's performance at Carnegie Hall.

Apparently her band, Vista High School Symphonic Winds, are fairly accomplished and had been invited to perform at Carnegie before, 10 yrs ago, in 2004.

They were the last of five bands to perform, my Niece is listed as playing the Euphonium


[Image: DV016_Jpg_Large_460225.jpg]

Since Carnegie Hall adheres to a strict, no recording rule (they usually have someone record for these HS events, but not for this one Tongue), I was at least able to record this so the rest of my family who couldn't make it could at least hear it... Again, it sounded great, although you can't tell from the vid's audio, very well, all five groups were exceptional, though it seemed my Niece's band sounded the best Wink

In fact they had won the opportunity to 'debut' a composition commissioned for them by composer, Brett Abigaña, who was also in attendance to see his piece debuted by her band Cool

Quote:Brett Abigaña's music has been performed throughout the United States and Europe, including performances on Dutch Public Radio, and his music has been commissioned and premiered by numerous performers including violist David Samuel, violinist Carla Leurs, flutist Hilary Abigaña, The Destino Winds, ALEA III, The Afiara String Quartet, and The Webster Trio. Abigaña has written a wide variety of music including chamber music for strings and winds, song cycles, and numerous pieces for orchestra and symphonic band, including several concertos. He has gained a reputation for writing expressive, triadic music, and is much in demand as a guest lecturer, clinician, and conductor.

Abigaña completed his Bachelor and Master of Music degrees at The Juilliard School where he studied with Samuel Adler and Robert Beaser, and received his Doctorate of Musical Arts from Boston University where he studied with Samuel Headrick and Richard Cornell. Other studies include composition, harmony, and counterpoint with Narcis Bonet, Michel Merlet, and Philip Lasser at La Schola Cantorum in Paris, as well as conducting with Judith Clurman, and solfége with Mary Anthony Cox.

It's the last song they perform at 18:46 and called, "Down the Lonely Path"





These are the songs they performed, listed in the program:

-Windsprints
-Symphony for the Band
-Movements II Adagio Sostenuto &IV Vivace
-Awayday
-Down the Lonely Path (World Premiere, commissioned for Vista, composed by Brett Abigana)
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04-30-2014, 06:16 AM
Post: #93
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such
^^Thanks for sharing this, Tusk. Those are some exciting pieces they played! I absolutely love symphonic wind bands (sometimes known as concert band, although that maybe have been in my prehistoric days Tongue ).

The euphonium has a gorgeous tone (of course, I do happen to be predisposed with a love of the brass family of instruments). It isn't an instrument used, thus heard often, which is a shame!

Has your niece mentioned that she enjoyed working on these pieces in preparation to the trip?
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04-30-2014, 06:01 PM
Post: #94
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such
How exciting for your niece to be able to perform at Carnegie Hall. She must have such a feeling of accomplishment after this. Not to mention what a great addition mentioning this performance on a college application or resume will make. Smile

Congrats to your niece, and thanks for sharing this with us Tusk!
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04-30-2014, 06:22 PM (This post was last modified: 04-30-2014 06:40 PM by Tusk.)
Post: #95
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such
Unfortunately, I flew in the day of the performance, and only had maybe 10 minutes to talk to her. I told her how proud I was, especially that she is making an effort to succeed at such a level Heart

My sis was a little annoyed that we didn't have more time, that her Uncle flew all the way to see her. I told my Sis that it's OK, usually in these outings with upwards of 30 kids, the agenda is usually full to avoid 'down time', when the young seem to find trouble or it finds them Wink

I told her that it was most important that she knew I came and I showed my Niece support for such an accomplishment as a proud Uncle. She's been in the music program a long time, and as you know, I always try to encourage young people to flex their creative muscles Tongue

(04-30-2014 06:01 PM)Babbs234 Wrote:  How exciting for your niece to be able to perform at Carnegie Hall. She must have such a feeling of accomplishment after this. Not to mention what a great addition mentioning this performance on a college application or resume will make. Smile

Congrats to your niece, and thanks for sharing this with us Tusk!

My sister replied to my sending the link to the video. Apparently, when the composition will be officially released, it'll be my Niece's High School who will be performing it, including being credited too!! Cool

Quote:I did not know until New York but I can't remember when I was told and if you were around or not. But the composer wrote this piece specifically for Vista. It has not been released to the public yet and when it is released, it'll be Vista's band playing the music AND it'll show Vista in the credits!! Pretty cool. Kristina (person of little emotion) was pretty happy when she found that out so at least to her it is a big deal, which it should be. Something to be proud of!!
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05-08-2014, 08:47 AM (This post was last modified: 05-08-2014 09:06 AM by Tom22.)
Post: #96
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such
(04-27-2014 05:12 PM)My Alter Ego Wrote:  It's a delicate dance, which is why when the result is good, great, or better, it's such a delight! But you know this, Tom.
yep we're on the same page

Quote:I do wonder if you haven't mistaken a "command performance" with "standing ovation."

But again, congrats on your discovery!

I didn't really mean "command performance" in it's traditional sense but more of "what should be expected of the greats on a great occasion" ...

I meant "great performance" as in.. one that perhaps the musicians themselves would reminisce on as being one of their greatest ever of the work when they're in their rocking chairs in the old age homes.... ; ) All pro works are "great" (that is why they're professionals") but a term for "great among greats" or something. I used the term "command performance" that way, when really it is more about the quality of those invited than the result I suppose.

I certainly would have given that performance and ovation by standards I'm accustomed to but we starry-eyed Californians can be a bit more openly effusive than those Germans with their tight lipped Teutonic demeanor.

Ovations can be given "on a curve"... i.e. a local symphony playing beyond their capacity or a youth group showing huge promise can deserve enthusiastic ovations without anyone thinking that meant they had seen a legendary performance.

And the opportunity to hear some performers play an encore is just so tempting that .... I can't imagine not giving some great like Isaac Perleman a standing ovation.. if only out of respect for his recordings , gratitude for his visit etc,

and, by tradition when I used to go to the LA phillharmonic and SF symphony, well, if there weren't at least a few curtain calls you'd think it was a terrible performance...

I definitely remember some sheepish encores and feeling obligated to keep clapping to save the person coming on for another call to have the applause wain and leave them standing there with the flowers in a quieter room as people began leaving... or worse if people started leaving while they came out to play the encore.

Tongue So, re ovation, no.. people standing up out of their seats clapping and 5 curtain calls does not mean people have just seen something legendary.. that's just a "pretty good" day at the SF symphony (unless that has changed in the last 20 years). Many "true" (would be? ) music aficionados would sit around and savor what they just heard sometimes by discussing its flaws... at least 19 to 20 year old ones who fancied themselves knowledgeable and who attacked it like a hobby, having listened to the pieces that would be performed repeatedly in the weeks before the concert and ready to discern the minutia in the decisions.

; )

(04-30-2014 06:01 PM)Babbs234 Wrote:  How exciting for your niece to be able to perform at Carnegie Hall. She must have such a feeling of accomplishment after this. Not to mention what a great addition mentioning this performance on a college application or resume will make. Smile

Congrats to your niece, and thanks for sharing this with us Tusk!

Dittos from me Tusk.. impressive recording too.

I enjoyed that "new" composition too.. which is something I won't always say about "'' new "' "classical music" (even Bartok is questionable for me .. : ) )

I 'll listen to the whole thing later but wanted to share my appreciation in case I don't check in for a week or two.
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07-20-2014, 12:31 PM (This post was last modified: 07-20-2014 02:59 PM by My Alter Ego.)
Post: #97
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such
Fairly recently, in responding to a comment that Tusk had made (in the "Sonic Boom" thread), I had responded that jazz wasn't "old school" as he had mentioned, but rather his experience with it had been "old school." Mercfan asked me if I could point her in directions that were more current jazz. At the time, I danced around my response, largely because I couldn't remember the name of the group (Next Collective) for a song that's been haunting me since I first heard it (Africa -- try finding it without knowing the name of the group -- I dare ya), and I was unsure about another song that I can't get out of my head, being, etc (and, truly don't want to).

I've since communicated with mercfan directly. And since then, I've decided to share a few of those options with the rest of you who may be interested.

Sister Cheryl - Wynton Marsalis. While this song seems to have been recorded early in Wynton's career (like about 30+ years ago), it doesn't have "that 80's" sound to me. It has a timeless quality to it. In addition to it's cool bossa nova rhythm and "addictive bassline" (according to a commentor on the Youtube recording -- he's right), I think this has just one of the best improv solos Wynton's done (if not the best), his "Standard Time" series, notwithstanding.





Africa - Next Collective. Some of you know, others may have only picked up on my lack of enthusiasm for non-acoustic instruments (pianos, guitars, etc.). Which is why my love of this piece is baffling to me, much less anybody else. But the electric piano here almost sounds like a vibraphone, and gives the song a haunting and ethereal sound to it.



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02-12-2015, 11:54 AM
Post: #98
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such
While looking for more Khatia the other day I stumbled on the web site below.

They have recorded quite a nice library of classical peformances and they've made some available free to watch on the web.

They have an intersting wrinkle YOU CAN READ the Score as the music plays!

I know that's not for everyone but I really enjoy(ed) it. They won't embed like youtube videos so you'll need to follow the link

Here is a link to a Motzart Clarinet concerto for you MAE


https://medici-verbier.weezic.com/en/per...es/25/play

Another khatia.. playing a short chopin prelude:

https://medici-verbier.weezic.com/en/per...ces/7/play

and here is an article at their site provided mostly because it allows better navigation from the sidebars to read what they're about and their goals and offerings etc.

http://www.medici.tv/#/khatia-buniatishv...tival-2011
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02-16-2015, 11:59 AM
Post: #99
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such
(02-12-2015 11:54 AM)Tom22 Wrote:  While looking for more Khatia the other day I stumbled on the web site below.

They have recorded quite a nice library of classical peformances and they've made some available free to watch on the web.

They have an intersting wrinkle YOU CAN READ the Score as the music plays!

I know that's not for everyone but I really enjoy(ed) it. They won't embed like youtube videos so you'll need to follow the link

Here is a link to a Motzart Clarinet concerto for you MAE


https://medici-verbier.weezic.com/en/per...es/25/play

Another khatia.. playing a short chopin prelude:

https://medici-verbier.weezic.com/en/per...ces/7/play

and here is an article at their site provided mostly because it allows better navigation from the sidebars to read what they're about and their goals and offerings etc.

http://www.medici.tv/#/khatia-buniatishv...tival-2011

Tom, thanks for these finds. Two of my favorite pieces. Like you, I enjoyed being able to follow the score. Very glad I never had to play/memorize that Mozart concerto. Yikes -- that's "a lot of notes!"*

The soloists were both excellent. Khatia's concentration/focus, while she's playing is amazing. It's almost as though she's absorbed by the music. Very interesting to watch.

* A variation of the line "too many notes" in Amadeus.
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06-15-2015, 06:44 PM
Post: #100
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such
While the "battle" of plagiarism/giving/not giving credit to arrangements/songs wages on over on The Voice Season 8 thread, I thought I'd come over here to discuss an observation that I made rather recently.

And that observation is that the show stopper in Les Mis, "Bring Him Home," supposedly written specifically for Colm Wilkinson, has major similarities to the "Humming Song" from Madame Butterfly.

Humming Song





Bring Him Home




I guess Mr. Puccini must not have any family around that can go after Claude-Michel Schönberg, composer of the Les Mis music.
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