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Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such
07-29-2012, 12:00 PM
Post: #21
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such
(07-27-2012 01:56 AM)LovinDaHaley Wrote:  ^^ Very Nice! Both the Holst Mars clip and the re-post of that Hay-Field video kicked off a long-overdue and intimate listening session with some of my favorite horn blowers.

My dad was a great trumpeter so I grew up with a tremendous amount of love and respect for the brass. I didn't realize it until tonight, but I've had a deaf ear to the trumpets since dad passed. Anyways, thanks again for posting-up with those those videos guys, it kicked off some long overdue healing.

Lovinda, truly I'm sorry for your loss (your dad).

However, in an earlier post, you suggested that we are twins in a parellel universe. Well, the connection may thicken -- I'm a former trumpet player. I quit playing because of jaw pain (TMJ), but I still love brass.

So, with that I offer a couple of my favorite Wynton pieces:

When It's Sleepytime Down South





Bourbon Street Parade



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07-30-2012, 01:18 AM
Post: #22
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such

Heart Thank You MAE - Very Sweet Heart

Nice selection too Smile - I consider Wynton Marsalis one of the world's true treasures within the music industry. And for so many reasons, he's also one of my personal jazz heroes!

So now, totally unrelated and in a different league all together, here’s another video featuring the horn. But maybe some of y'all aint the biggest Yanni-man fans in the world; and quite frankly neither am I. As a matter of fact, in certain situations I 'd probably be the first one to say an unfavorable thing or two about Yanni and his music. Nevertheless, when it comes to making a concert DVD the man finds and hires some of the best musicians in the world for the project at hand; Moreover, he knows how to place his best players on a silver platter and serve them to his DVD viewing audience.

Love or hate New Age style music (overall I lean towards the latter) this piece is serving as a terrific showpiece for some extraordinary talent. I could probably watch it a million times and still never tire of it.
Yanni, “Dance With A Stranger”, Feat. Luis Aquino on the Flugelhorn:

Luis Aquino's smoking hot Flugelhorn solo starts at 4:45
Directly following Ming Freeman doing his happy thing on the keys Big Grin


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07-30-2012, 08:02 PM
Post: #23
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such
(07-30-2012 01:18 AM)LovinDaHaley Wrote:  
Heart Thank You MAE - Very Sweet Heart

Nice selection too Smile - I consider Wynton Marsalis one of the world's true treasures within the music industry. And for so many reasons, he's also one of my personal jazz heroes!

So now, totally unrelated and in a different league all together, here’s another video featuring the horn. But maybe some of y'all aint the biggest Yanni-man fans in the world; and quite frankly neither am I. As a matter of fact, in certain situations I 'd probably be the first one to say an unfavorable thing or two about Yanni and his music. Nevertheless, when it comes to making a concert DVD the man finds and hires some of the best musicians in the world for the project at hand; Moreover, he knows how to place his best players on a silver platter and serve them to his DVD viewing audience.

Love or hate New Age style music (overall I lean towards the latter) this piece is serving as a terrific showpiece for some extraordinary talent. I could probably watch it a million times and still never tire of it.
Yanni, “Dance With A Stranger”, Feat. Luis Aquino on the Flugelhorn:

Luis Aquino's smoking hot Flugelhorn solo starts at 4:45
Directly following Ming Freeman doing his happy thing on the keys Big Grin



Even if one doesn't particularly care for Wynton Marsalis, it's hard to deny a man who was the first to win a Grammy in the both classical and jazz categories in the same year -- and then, the following year do a repeat performance! Then, there are the multiple things beyond that. I'm so impressed with his leadership/stewardship of the "Essentially Ellington" series/competition, and the opportunities that young people have derived through it!

As you mentioned, "New Age" is not everyone's cup of tea, but you provided probably one of the better examples (to listen to). Luis Aquino's solos are very enjoyable. I'll be revisiting this thread to listen again. (I will also be revisiting the Chris Botti piece that you posted earlier.)

I will leave another clip -- one I only recently encountered.

Clifford Brown - Stardust




(Sorry about the ad -- it wasn't there earlier.)
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07-30-2012, 08:17 PM (This post was last modified: 07-30-2012 08:24 PM by midnightblues.)
Post: #24
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such


Hey gang what Coola bout this one???? Nothing digital, here as raw as it gets with Getz and Coltrane
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07-31-2012, 12:57 AM
Post: #25
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such
^^ Thank you MAE for the loving encouragement. You're always such an edifying person. And hey, nice find on that Clifford Brown clip (I've never seen it before either). I absolutely love listening to Brownie (that really was his nickname). His phrasing and improvisation... Wow! He never loses me.


^ And thank you Bluesman for that super cool Stan Getz and John Coltrane clip:

Stan Getz: For my ears he had the best tone of any jazz saxophone player ever. His warm, lyrical tone, and his melodic and rhythmic senses are unparalleled. For me personally, his straight ahead Jazz was among some of the most thought-provoking and beautiful ever. I particularly like his contributions to the bossa nova movement of the 60s (lyrical fusion of samba and jazz).

John Coltrane: Wow, his technical abilities were just STFU sick! Saying his tone was large is a massive understatement. But I must confess, I find him a bit lacking in the beauty, melodic sentimentality and emotion. Other than being awed by his technical abilities I've never really enjoyed his music much. To me he's loud and brash, a never ceasing bombardment and assault upon my auditory sense. Even so, I really enjoyed that clip because the two of them together made for an exhilarating ride of technical skill and beauty.

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07-31-2012, 06:52 AM
Post: #26
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such
(07-31-2012 12:57 AM)LovinDaHaley Wrote:  ^^ Thank you MAE for the loving encouragement. You're always such an edifying person. And hey, nice find on that Clifford Brown clip (I've never seen it before either). I absolutely love listening to Brownie (that really was his nickname). His phrasing and improvisation... Wow! He never loses me.


^ And thank you Bluesman for that super cool Stan Getz and John Coltrane clip:

Stan Getz: For my ears he had the best tone of any jazz saxophone player ever. His warm, lyrical tone, and his melodic and rhythmic senses are unparalleled. For me personally, his straight ahead Jazz was among some of the most thought-provoking and beautiful ever. I particularly like his contributions to the bossa nova movement of the 60s (lyrical fusion of samba and jazz).

John Coltrane: Wow, his technical abilities were just STFU sick! Saying his tone was large is a massive understatement. But I must confess, I find him a bit lacking in the beauty, melodic sentimentality and emotion. Other than being awed by his technical abilities I've never really enjoyed his music much. To me he's loud and brash, a never ceasing bombardment and assault upon my auditory sense. Even so, I really enjoyed that clip because the two of them together made for an exhilarating ride of technical skill and beauty.


In regards to Brownie, I was quite dismayed with myself for not seeking his stuff out earlier. Of course, I'd heard of him, but had not actually listened to him. What a stupid thing for me to do! What I've missed out on, lo, these many years! (I plan to try to make up for it.)

I agree with absolutely every thing you said about Getz and Coltrane! (And thanks for using the phrase "straight ahead jazz." Haven't heard that in years!) That said, there was an album "the Trane" recorded with Johnny Hartman, in which he laid back a bit and didn't muscle his way through every solo. Here's an example:



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07-31-2012, 03:13 PM
Post: #27
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such

^ Oh hell yes! That's very nice MAE! And wow, what an incredible difference from anything Coltrane in my collection. I never would have guessed who was on sax in that number had I been blindly questioned. And it's not that I've never heard his softer side; heck, I even have the album, "The Gentle Side of John Coltrane". I reckon that I just never listened close enough to notice how skilled he was at magnifying and exalting vocalists. I enjoyed the song in that video so much that I continued on to some more of Coltrane with singers; Lo and behold, he played with a good dose of beauty and feeling in those as well. I'm surprised that I had never noticed that before; but then again, I was probably already tainted by the hardtrane before ever hearing him in pieces like this, thus always paying more attention to the other players and the singer.

And OMG, Johnny Hartman turns me into a puddle of mush. The soft jazz crooners of that era were flipping incredible.

What a fantastic addition to the things that I really, really, really, REALLY enjoy. What more can I say - Thanks a million MAE!
[Image: love0029.gif] LovinDaMAE Today [Image: love0029.gif]


Here's a nice clip containing Johnny Hartman performing, "Cardboard In My Shoes":




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08-02-2012, 01:50 AM (This post was last modified: 08-02-2012 05:14 AM by LovinDaHaley.)
Post: #28
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such

Up loader’s Video Description: "The Count Basie Orchestra of 1962, in all its swinging glory. Frank Wess, Frank Foster, Eric Dixon, Thad Jones, Al Aarons, Snooky Young -- and Freddie Green laying down those perfect 4/4 chords. Sonny Payne is the drummer you're asking about."

Count Basie Orchestra - Corner Pocket


Blow Me Down, check out that Thad Jones trumpet solo!

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08-02-2012, 07:46 AM
Post: #29
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such
^^^Ohhh, yes!! Classic Basie! When his sax section plays, particularly in unison, it is sooo smooth. And yes, the Thad Jones solo is sweet! He must have been a big man -- that trumpet looks like a toy.

Actually, I'd never heard this song done by Basie until a few years back. But years ago, when Manhattan Transfer released the album "Mecca for Moderns," I spent hours listening to the tune "Until I Met You." I listened, in part, because I loved it, but also because I knew that it had to be one of their vocalese renditions, but I couldn't couldn't figure it out who had done the original and I wasn't picking up clues from the album notes. Then one day, I really "heard" the piano intro -- and the light came on.
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08-02-2012, 05:14 PM
Post: #30
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such
(08-02-2012 07:46 AM)My Alter Ego Wrote:  ^^^Ohhh, yes!! Classic Basie! When his sax section plays, particularly in unison, it is sooo smooth. And yes, the Thad Jones solo is sweet! He must have been a big man -- that trumpet looks like a toy.

^ MAE need more sax? Blush Tongue

As for the size of Thad Jones <grin>, he was a man with big hands <hee hee>, but I'd guess he was only about 5’ 11, 190 lbs.. But hey look, what's that up in the sky? Isn’t that a Cleveland Greyhound Peashooter that "Mr. Magnificent" is playing? I’d say for sure it is a peashooter design because it’s very long and narrow with a small bell, but I’m just guessing on the make. I think it's a Cleveland Greyhound because they made some peashooters during the 20’s and 30’s which have a tamer sound than the other makes commonly used by the fat cat trumpeters of the big band era (and Thad’s solo in that Blazing Saddles number doesn't have an overly tight 'n bright sound, such as it would were he playing, for example, a Conn Vocabell, once the staple of the Duke Ellington trumpet section).

Duke Ellington - Cat Anderson's "El Gato" (Germany '59)


Count Basie Big Band



Yes? No? Inquiring mind needs to know Big Grin

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