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Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such
08-02-2012, 11:00 PM
Post: #31
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such
Nice Big Grin
I'm in awe at the breadth of your musical knowledge, LovinDa ... something for everyone Smile
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08-03-2012, 12:08 AM (This post was last modified: 08-03-2012 12:09 AM by LovinDaHaley.)
Post: #32
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such
^ Thanks T-Man. But nothing to be in awe about, it's just that all my dad ever talked about was music. It's everyone else's knowlege of music that makes this the best Haley fansite; It really is the biggest compliment to her.

PS. Correction to my post about the trumpet Thad was likely playing: I meant to say, "in that Corner Pocket video", not, "in that Blazing Saddles number".
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08-03-2012, 08:05 AM
Post: #33
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such
(08-02-2012 05:14 PM)LovinDaHaley Wrote:  
(08-02-2012 07:46 AM)My Alter Ego Wrote:  ^^^Ohhh, yes!! Classic Basie! When his sax section plays, particularly in unison, it is sooo smooth. And yes, the Thad Jones solo is sweet! He must have been a big man -- that trumpet looks like a toy.

^ MAE need more sax? Blush Tongue

As for the size of Thad Jones <grin>, he was a man with big hands <hee hee>, but I'd guess he was only about 5’ 11, 190 lbs.. But hey look, what's that up in the sky? Isn’t that a Cleveland Greyhound Peashooter that "Mr. Magnificent" is playing? I’d say for sure it is a peashooter design because it’s very long and narrow with a small bell, but I’m just guessing on the make. I think it's a Cleveland Greyhound because they made some peashooters during the 20’s and 30’s which have a tamer sound than the other makes commonly used by the fat cat trumpeters of the big band era (and Thad’s solo in that Blazing Saddles number doesn't have an overly tight 'n bright sound, such as it would were he playing, for example, a Conn Vocabell, once the staple of the Duke Ellington trumpet section).

Yes? No? Inquiring mind needs to know Big Grin


MAE need more sax? No, Basie's quartet is sufficient.

As for the other double entendres: they are noted, but I'm too tired to play. Sorry, I know that's not fun, but hey....

As for your "inquiring minds" question, I think you are far more knowledgeable about the "peashooter" than I, since it was your message above in which I learned about it. (While I played trumpet, I've not been hugely interested in it's evolution. OK -- so I'll whack myself now.)

What I had noticed (in the "Corner Pocket" vid) was that none of the dimensions of the horn, as I know it, seemed right: the small bell, the narrowness, and, to me, it seemed shorter than the "average" trumpet. I do realize that my perception of the length has a lot to do with the fact that the camera shot was mostly straight at Thad Jones, and because of that I couldn't get an accurate sense of the trumpet's length.

However, in a very brief internet exploration, what I found interesting was the idea that " a smaller bore" made a "less bright" sound. As I mentioned above, I hadn't really paid that much attention to the "evolution" of the instrument, but suddenly it's become more interesting to me.

And, herein, lies the evolution, as I know it. By the time that I was learning/working the trumpet, theory had shifted in so many ways (and, as a daughter of a trumpet player, you probably know that), but very generally, the concept of "less air" generally just produced a thinner sound. As a beginner, one starts out with a smaller mouthpiece and a "student" horn that presumably has a smaller bore, all of which needs less air to produce, and as said student progresses, he (or she, although that's still not common) should be getting a different instrument that can handle more air and a bigger mouthpiece as well.

At the point that I was playing, it was the metal that the instrument was made of that was considered to be the determining factor of tone: brass produced a (surprise!) "brassy" tone; silver, that piercing bright tone that was so popular in the seventies, and gold, a warmer, richer tone. All of which was followed by the theory that not including the lacquer finish (Wynton's signature horn) added to the warmth and richness of the tone.

Personally, I think it all boils down to breath support. My friend (and first trumpet teacher, "sorta" sister, mentor, etc.) plays with perfect breath support (which explains how she was able to play when she had taken a fall, and had a hairline fracture of her upper jaw). It didn't matter whether she played a student horn, my horn with a silver finish or hers with the gold finish (they were the same model, just different finishes), she always had a full, honeyed tone that could make you melt.
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08-03-2012, 01:34 PM (This post was last modified: 08-03-2012 01:37 PM by LovinDaHaley.)
Post: #34
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such


^ The part in blue, I have no idea what you're talking about. Angel

As for having knowledge about one's own instrument... I know less about guitars (my instrument) than I do trumpets (can't get a single good note out of one without passing out in the process of trying). I just never needed to know much about guitars to buy one; If the look, feel and sound are so awesome that I can't put it down, so be it, I'll just take it home with me. Big Grin

As for what I know about trumpets... I didn't even know that metals or finishes played such a big part in the sound (but that does make sense). For the most part I just regurgitate things my dad taught me (however, for discussions at this site I'll usually do a little research to verify before posting). And daddy always talked as if having a strong lip was the only thing that really mattered (his lips were like iron).

Thank you for the info MAE!


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08-04-2012, 01:13 AM (This post was last modified: 08-04-2012 01:13 AM by LovinDaHaley.)
Post: #35
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such

Eliane Elias - Samba Triste


Cachao and Bebo Valdez - Lagrimas Negras



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08-04-2012, 02:18 AM (This post was last modified: 08-04-2012 03:12 AM by Tom22.)
Post: #36
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such
ok .. here's one I was sharing to my facebook crowd.. trying to show the few hundred friends of mine I don't only log on there once a month to plug Haley...

Some how there is something about Louis Armstrong that touches me and... I'm thinking there is some similary thing I hear when I hear Haley (no its not the rasp... i'm alsot talking about his phrasing with the trumpet and ..... I think there is a world-view they share ...that just comes out in how they juxtapose emotions in a melody..... ok .. not tonight



here's another trying to show the emotions I like in music....a mix of complete self assurance , yet a tenderness and vulnerabilty ... and a sadness that reality is sometimes in conflict with the ideal... so unfortunate...





(07-30-2012 08:17 PM)midnightblues Wrote:  

Hey gang what Coola bout this one???? Nothing digital, here as raw as it gets with Getz and Coltrane

That is definitely classic

I can "dig" the era but as much as I understand where Getz is going it just doesn't put me somewhere comfotable with his studied lack of chord resolves (and that's perhaps exactly the artistic point)

Henry Mancini.. perhaps in a watered down way ... he had some pretty energetic stuff that did resolve chords

...but there was actually (in my mind) some pretty exciting sounds to all sorts of TV theme songs and movies (I dream of Genie... 60's Bond... so many others).

Here is part of the background party score from breakfast at tiffanies





Thats only one of about 5 "party" orchestrations.. most of which were barely heard if at all. (at the end of that clip there is part of another)

Man .. some of the movies were beautiful then too.. the use of light

not necessarily for the music but because she's gorgeous





ok this one is just for the glamor of it and the light filters etc



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08-04-2012, 02:27 PM (This post was last modified: 08-04-2012 02:52 PM by LovinDaHaley.)
Post: #37
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such

Nice post Tom! Loved all the clips and really enjoyed all your commentary, especially what you said about Haley and Louis Armstrong:

"Some how there is something about Louis Armstrong that touches me and... I'm thinking there is some similary thing I hear when I hear Haley (no its not the rasp... i'm alsot talking about his phrasing with the trumpet and ..... I think there is a world-view they share ...that just comes out in how they juxtapose emotions in a melody....."

There's something about Haley and Louis that touches me too, and I agree, I think it's their shared "world-view" and how it comes through in their music.

Louis Armstrong - 1970
What A Wonderful World (Spoken Intro Version)


Haley Reinhart - 2011
Earth Song (Spoken Intro Version)



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08-04-2012, 03:34 PM
Post: #38
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such
(08-04-2012 02:27 PM)LovinDaHaley Wrote:  
Nice post Tom! Loved all the clips and really enjoyed all your commentary, especially what you said about Haley and Louis Armstrong:

"Some how there is something about Louis Armstrong that touches me and... I'm thinking there is some similary thing I hear when I hear Haley (no its not the rasp... i'm alsot talking about his phrasing with the trumpet and ..... I think there is a world-view they share ...that just comes out in how they juxtapose emotions in a melody....."

There's something about Haley and Louis that touches me too, and I agree, I think it's their shared "world-view" and how it comes through in their music.

Louis Armstrong - 1970
What A Wonderful World (Spoken Intro Version)


Haley Reinhart - 2011
Earth Song (Spoken Intro Version)




LovinDaHaley ... thanks and sounds like we think alike on some important things ourselves.

I loved Armstrongs introduction. So much history to that and....well I won't even start as this isn't the place for it...so complex in terms of approach and history and tactics etc.

Just ... how about some Haley words :

They call me crazy,
But I'm just waiting
For the world around me to change.


I'm thinking maybe if we look inside
We'll find a loving piece of mind.


Can't see their halos
Can't feel their wings, no
But I got faith that the angels will sing

Walking on Heaven, walking on Heaven
Streets we're on are paved in gold.

Walking on Heaven, walking on Heaven
Free your mind and let it go.

Some call it lazy, But all that I'm saying
Is please, don't waste your time.

We can keep hating,
But why not try saving
The love that is blind.

Can't see their halos
Can't feel their wings, no
But I got faith that the angels will sing

Let's call it Heaven, Isn't it precious.

Some say we're dreaming, But we're just believing.
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08-04-2012, 05:39 PM (This post was last modified: 08-04-2012 05:40 PM by My Alter Ego.)
Post: #39
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such

LovinDa, musically very nice additions. But intriguing/puzzling as well. First, you've got a woman pianist, who kicks off her shoes to play. That's just funny.

But, in the second vid, when I first noticed it, I thought the bass player had bandages around the middle two fingers of his right hand. I wondered how he could play so well? As I continued to study, the "bandages" began looking more like sewing thimbles.

I've seen guitar players use picks. Are there picks that cover fingers more completely? Is that what he's using?
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08-04-2012, 06:46 PM
Post: #40
RE: Fine Music - Orchestra, Big Band, Classical and Such

I'm glad you enjoyed those videos MAE Big Grin
I really love Latin Jazz. Heart

As for why Eliane Elias, "The Barefoot Brazilian", plays barefoot; she simply answers that question with, “When I sit down, I play barefoot. When I stand up, I’m in very high heels. It comes naturally, I guess.”

Cachao taped those 82-year-old fingers for protection. Taping fingers is somewhat common among Latin Jazz Congo players, I imagine he got the idea from them.



It's a little cloudy and rainy right now in Vegas, and for some strange reason that means it's Classical Music time. So here ya go...

Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra - Mussorgsky Pictures at an Exhibition (1/3)



Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra - R.Strauss Ein Heldenleben (1/4)


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