YouTube monetization
02-27-2015, 05:32 PM, (This post was last modified: 02-27-2015, 05:46 PM by Tusk.)
#11
RE: Haley making a video with Scott Bradlee and PMJ
(02-27-2015, 04:59 PM)30CamdenSquare Wrote: Where did this $0.30 - $2.50/1000 rate come from?

(02-27-2015, 02:42 PM)Tusk Wrote: I posted about this on this very thread just a week ago Tongue
http://haleyfans.com/showthread.php?tid=...0#pid44740
(and posted videos about this on other threads)

Reposted from the above link:
Quote:YouTube Economics

Making a few dollars of revenue on YouTube is easy; you can be up and running as a partner, pump out a few videos, and have your first ads appearing withing a day. The tough part is making enough money to support yourself full time. In a way, YouTube is a lot like professional baseball: a few stars make it big and get rich, but most toil in obscurity and retire without ever coming close to the big leagues.

Let’s put some more concrete figures around YouTube earnings potential:

Most publishers earn between $0.30 and $2.50 CPMs from YouTube. (I.e., they make between $0.30 and $2.50 for every video 1,000 views; this tool can help you figure out revenue potential.)

Some publishers are definitely getting rich from YouTube; the average of the top 1,000 channels is $23,000 of monthly revenue.

According to Google, “thousands of channels are making six figures a year”.
30% of the YouTube videos account for 99% of total views.

It’s very difficult to track down updated information about the average YouTube video, but the reality is that most videos posted on the site get fewer than 1,000 views. Here are a few older studies showing the disproportionate allocation of YouTube views:

The average YouTube video gets about 500 views, with 25% of total views coming in the first four days and most viewers watching less than 60 seconds. (2010).
Only about 10% of videos get more than 1,000 views in their first month (2008).
Half of all videos get fewer than 500 total views (2009).
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02-27-2015, 06:22 PM,
#12
RE: Haley making a video with Scott Bradlee and PMJ
That is very different from what the lady in this video is telling people when she says content creators make anywhere from "a few $$/1000 all the way up to $20/1000". That's what I was going by.



Both the article & her video came out in early 2014.
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02-27-2015, 06:35 PM, (This post was last modified: 02-27-2015, 07:03 PM by Tusk.)
#13
RE: Haley making a video with Scott Bradlee and PMJ
The range I'm referring to is what the ''average joes" earn.

The numbers talked about in the video are the one's that take it seriously, as a business. As I've said, some are able to negotiate their own rate with youtube or even a specific advertiser. Along with that, many of the 'money earners' on YouTube, if they're good enough, with a recognisable brand and a large, engaged following, can start earning money as spokespeople for advertisers... One example is ComicBookGirl19. She started off small, talking about Comic Books, now her and her crew do sponsorship appearnaces at conventions on top of earning money from their videos. I'm not sure she's one of those, 'earn six figures' YTubers, I'm fairly certain she's able to make a living with it.

Quote:Some publishers are definitely getting rich from YouTube; the average of the top 1,000 channels is $23,000 of monthly revenue.

According to Google, “thousands of channels are making six figures a year”.

If you really think about it, even though they take a sizeable cut off the advertising revenue, YT gives anyone unparralelled ability to make a comfortable living doing what you enjoy doing, as long as you have the talent, personality and work ethic.

Think about it? Earning six figures making videos on Youtube Tongue
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02-27-2015, 08:07 PM,
#14
RE: Haley making a video with Scott Bradlee and PMJ
^^ Yeah OK. You know more about it than I do. 30cents/1000 just seems like a ridiculously low starting CPM. Especially since I just learned that YT takes 45% off the top AND that youtubers are only paid for views in which the viewer watched the entire "pre-roll commercial" (the ad before the video). Maybe the $0.30-$2.50/1,000 range is a net figure - after the 45% is already taken out & figuring in the average % of viewers who actually watch the pre-roll commercial. Maybe not though.
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